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Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Study Shows Health Care Impact To County Economy

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Derek Nester
Derek Nester was born and raised in Blue Rapids, and graduated from Valley Heights High School in May of 2000. He attended Cowley College in Arkansas City and Johnson County Community College in Overland Park studying Journalism & Media Communications.After stops at KFRM and KCLY radio in Clay Center, he joined KNDY in 2002 as a board operator and play by play announcer. Derek is now responsible for the digital content of Dierking Communications, Inc. six radio stations.In 2005 Derek joined the staff of KCFX radio in Kansas City as a production coordinator for the Kansas City Chiefs Radio Network, which airs on over 94 radio stations across 12 Midwest states and growing. In 2018 he became the Studio Coordinator at the Cumulus Kansas City broadcast center for Kansas City Chiefs Football.

MARYSVILLE – A good local health care system may itself be part of the prescription for maintaining a healthy rural economy.

That was the bottom line from a study of the economic contribution of Marshall County’s health care system produced by researchers at K-State Research and Extension.

The study is part of a state-wide initiative called the Kansas Rural Health Works program, sponsored by the Kansas Hospital Association. As part of the program, a county-level analysis of the economic impacts and potential of the local health care sector on the economies of each of the state’s 105 counties has been generated.

According to the report, the health care sector accounted for an estimated 7.7 percent of Marshall County’s total employment, or about 541 jobs, in 2018. Further, the study’s authors calculated economic multipliers for 13 health care sectors and estimated that health care directly and indirectly accounted for 701 jobs throughout the county economy. They go on to estimate that these same sectors accounted for more than $30,396,000 in total county income and about $17,082,000 in county retail sales.

“This study really underscores our local efforts to secure a county-wide sales tax in support of healthcare operations,” said Ashley Kracht, public relations director at Community Memorial Healthcare (CMH) in Marysville. “While we’ve received a lot of support from our patients, other county residents want to know ‘what’s in it for me’, so to speak,” she said. “Many people don’t realize how important having local health care services is to the county’s economic wellbeing.”

That is exactly the point the reports are trying to get across, according to Dr. John Leatherman, K-State agricultural economist and lead author of the report. He points out that access to affordable quality local health care services is essential to attracting and retaining local businesses and retirees.

Further, health care has been among the fastest growing economic sectors for the past 30 years. Given demographic trends, prospects for continued growth are good, and rural communities will want to be in a position to capture some of that growth, he said.

“Research has shown time and again that local health care and education are two enormously important factors for economic development,” Leatherman said, “and both can be positively or negatively influenced by local action or inaction.” He said the local health care system has sometimes been the “tie-breaker” in industry location decisions and that retirees view quality local health care as a “must have” local service.

Given the rapidly changing economics of health care systems, communities need to become more proactive in building a sustainable mix and level of services or risk losing local access, according to Tom Bell, President and CEO for the Kansas Hospital Association.

“It is important for all Kansans to be aware of the local events and recent data that paints a picture of vulnerability for rural hospitals in addition to lack of coverage to our citizens and lost revenue to our state.”

Rural hospitals face a unique set of challenges because of their remote geographic location, small size, scarce workforce, physician shortages, higher percentage of Medicare and Medicaid patients, and constrained financial resources with limited access to capital.

Nationwide, 113 rural hospitals have closed since 2010 due to financial troubles. In Kansas, five rural hospitals have already closed, but another 15 are in listed as in “financial distress”. While CMH has avoided being included in either of those categories, the trend is obvious, and the board of directors wishes to avoid being in a position to be faced with eliminating services or other drastic measures, Kracht said.

The Rural Health Works program is intended to highlight the need for local organization and initiative to maintain rural health care systems. Bell likened the need for broad community involvement focused on local health care to trying to maintain the local school district or Main Street businesses. “Inattention and inactivity can place a rural community at risk. Maintaining local access to quality health care services in rural places requires organization, planning and community support,” Bell said.

“Kansas hospitals are a critical piece of the economic engine in Kansas communities and a symbol of continued community cohesion. They are important not only for the health care services they deliver, but for maintaining the overall economic vitality and viability of the communities they serve,” said Bell.

“While we understand a hesitation to increase local taxes,” said Curtis Hawkinson, chief executive officer at CMH, “providing public sales tax revenue to support the hospital allows us to maintain our local autonomy in a time when federal and state funding are always in question, and out of our control. We hope the residents of Marshall County realize the impact of CMH, not only to the patients we serve, but also on our community as a whole.”

Copies of the full report have been distributed and are available free of charge at the Kansas Rural Health Works Website at: www.krhw.net. Printed copies are available at cost, plus shipping. Additional information about the program is available by contacting the Office of Local Government at K-State Research and Extension, 785-532-2643 or emailing jleather@ksu.edu.

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